The Primate Research Group (PRG) is mostly intersted in questions of eco-ethology of primates in natural environments.

Initially principally focussed on mechanisms of exploitation of habitats (feeding ecology and evolution of home ranges), the researches of the PRG are now dedicating a growing importance to the study of primate populations’ behavior in disturbed habitats.

Habiats modifications, often more or less directly related to anthropic pressure, are most often threatening the survival of animal and vegetal species, and notably non-human primate species. Of some species demonstrate a certain flexibility, others are les adaptable and therefore more fragile. The systematic evaluation of species adaptability and/or fragility when confronted to modifications of their environments is crucial for designing efficient measures of protection and conservation.

Through the study of primates behavior, the PRG is therefore increasingly interested in their conservation and in particular to the arguments underlining their importance: for instance, the role of non-human primates in maintenance and regeneration of forest habitat.  A second theme of importance focuses on the ecological dynamics characterizing non-human primate populations in anthropized habitats.

The PRG researches concentrated until now numerous species, from « great apes » (apes et « lesser-apes ») : gorillas, chimpanzees, gibbons, to « monkeys » (baboons, macaques, colobes, mangabeys, howlers, capuchins, tamarins,….).  The interest for species in natural environment can also imply moments of research in captivity , which we are carrying on in collaboration with partner zoos (notably Köln,  Mulhouse, Paris…).

The research group gathers, in permanent or temporary manner, the members of the primate team of the ULG, working within the Behavioral biology unit, as well as external collaborators, members of the ULG or coming from other Belgian or international institutions institutions.  The projects are using methods specific to the various problems under study and are also turning when necessary to other disciplines methodology, in complement to the strictly ethological methods (for instance in botanny, veterinarian sciences, bacteriology, parasitology, genetics,…)

Team

Brotcorne Fany

Email: eb.eg1566732623eilu@1566732623enroc1566732623torbf1566732623

Huynen, Marie-Claude

ECO-ETHOLOGY OF PRIMATES IN NATURAL HABITAT

ROLE OF PRIMATES IN MAINTENANCE AND REGENERATION OF FOREST ENVIRONMENTS

BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF PRIMATE POPULATIONS IN ANTHROPOGENIC ENVIRONMENTS

STRESS-RELATED BEHAVIOUR AND BIO-INDICATORS IN PRIMATES

  • Kaisin, Olivier (PhD student)
  • LETOT, Sylvie (master student)

ALUMNI

  • Devos, Céline
  • Albert, Aurélie
  • Serckx, Adeline
  • Granier, Nicolas
  • Hakizimana, Dismas
  • Martin-Solano, Sarah
  • Delooz, Sophie
  • Broens, Damien